Over-eating…Data

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. A.C. Wilson uses a retina scanner to positively identify a member of the Baghdaddi city council prior to a meeting with local tribal figureheads, sheiks, community leaders and U.S. service members deployed with Regimental Combat Team-7 in Baghdaddi, Iraq, on Jan. 10, 2007. Photo released by DOD

Despite their huge potential, artificial intelligence and biometrics still very much need human input for accurate identification, according to the director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.  Speaking at  an Atlantic Council event, Arati Prabhakar said that while the best facial recognition systems out there are statistically better than most humans at image identification, that when they’re wrong, “they are wrong in ways that no human would ever be wrong”….

“You want to embrace the power of these new technologies but be completely clear-eyed about what their limitations are so that they don’t mislead us,” Prabhakar said. That’s a stance humans must take with technology writ large, she said, explaining her hesitance to take for granted what many of her friends in Silicon Valley often assume  — that more data is always a good thing.  More data could just mean that you have so much data that whatever hypothesis you have you can find something that supports it,” Prabhakar said

See also DARPA Brandeis Project; Facebook’s collection of biometric information

DARPA director cautious over AI, biometrics, Planet Biometrics, May 4, 2016

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