Tag Archives: nuclear waste disposal and fracking

A Gasfield and the Cows Next to it

Protests against fracking Western Australia

High levels of a radioactive material and other contaminants have been found in water from a West Australian fracking site* but operators say it could be diluted and fed to beef cattle.  The revelations illustrate the potential risks associated with the contentious gas extraction process known as fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, as the Turnbull government pressures states to ease restrictions on the industry and develop their gas reserves.

The findings were contained in a report by oil and gas company Buru Energy that has not been made public. It shows the company also plans to reinject wastewater underground – a practice that has brought on seismic events when used in the United States.

Buru Energy has been exploring the potentially vast “tight gas” resources of the Kimberly region’s Canning Basin. The work was suspended when the WA government last year introduced a fracking moratorium, subject to the findings of a scientific inquiry.

In a submission to the inquiry obtained by the Lock the Gate Alliance, Buru Energy said a “relatively high concentration” of Radium-228…The samples exceeded drinking water guidelines for radionuclides. However Buru Energy said samples collected from retention ponds were below guideline levels and the water posed “no risk to humans or animals”.  Water monitoring also detected elevated levels of the chemical elements barium, boron and chloride….Buru Energy said while the water was not suitable for human consumption, the “reuse of flowback water for beef cattle may also be considered”.  The water did not meet stockwater guidelines but this could be addressed “through dilution with bore water”.

The company’s development in the Yulleroo area of the basin could lead to 80 wells operating over 20 years….The company insists its fracking fluids are non-toxic and to illustrate its safety, executive chairman Eric Streitberg drank the fluid at the company’s 2016 annual general meeting.

Excerpt from  Nicole Hasham Radioactive water reignites concerns over fracking for gas, Sydney Morning Herald, June 24, 2018

*Fracking, which involves injecting water mixed with chemicals and sand deep underground in order to fracture rock and release oil and gas, generates large amounts of wastewater. … In some cases, improper handling of this waste water has resulted in the release of radioactive fracking waste that has contaminated streams and rivers, Science Magazine, Apr 9, 2015

For Voices against Fracking in WA, Dont Frack WA

The Nuclear Waste Dumpers-TENORM

landfill-with-radioactive-waste-sign

The state of Kentucky announced on Mondy November 14, 2016  that it will seek large civil penalties against various companies and individuals responsible for the dumping of radioactive waste in landfills located in Estill and Greenup counties…  In some cases, the fines are greater than $2 million…The penalties are the result of illegal activity discovered in landfills in early 2016 and target the processors, transporters and brokers responsible for the transfer of those materials into Kentucky landfills. Evidence shows the activity began as early as May 2015 and involved the illegal transport and disposal of “technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material” or “TENORM,” which is a byproduct of pressurized oil drilling or fracking…

The Department for Public Health, within the cabinet, is seeking penalties against Advanced TENORM Services of West Liberty in the amount of $2.65 million; Cory Hoskins, owner of BES of West Liberty, $2.65 million. BES does business as Advanced Tenorm Services, and Hoskins was listed as the owner of BES, according to the state.

Other companies to be fined include Fairmont Brine Processing LLC, of Pittsburgh, $1.012 million; Mountain States Environmental of Lancaster, Ohio, $615,000; L.R. Daniels Transportation, Inc. of Ashland $612,000; Pressure Technology of Ohio of Norwich, Ohio, $338,00; Nuverra Environmental Solutions, Inc. of Scottsdale, Ariz., $143,000; E&R Energy, LLC of Norwich, Ohio ,$140,000; and Cambrian Wells Services, LLC in Norwich, Ohio $30,000.

Excerpts from Kentucky radioactive waste dumpers could face millions in fines, www. kentucky.com, Nov. 14, 2016

 

Drilling Deep into the Earth for Nuclear Waste

Rugby, North Dakota

The federal government plans to spend $80 million ( assessing whether its hottest nuclear waste can be stored in 3-mile-deep holes, a project that could provide an alternative strategy to a Nevada repository plan that was halted in 2010.  The five-year borehole project was tentatively slated to start later this year on state-owned land in rural North Dakota, but it has already been met with opposition from state and local leaders who want more time to review whether the plan poses any public danger…The Department of Energy wants to conduct its work just south of the Canadian border on 20 acres near Rugby, North Dakota — in part because it’s in a rural area not prone to earthquakes — but is prepared to look elsewhere if a deal can’t be reached. Some sites in West Texas and New Mexico have expressed interest in becoming interim sites for above-ground nuclear waste storage, but it’s not clear if they would be considered for borehole technology.

Project leaders say the research will require months of drilling deep into the earth but will not involve any nuclear waste. Instead, dummy canisters without radioactive material would be used in the project’s third and final phase.  The research team will look at deep rock to check its water permeability, stability, geothermal characteristics and seismic activity — a central concern with burying the hot radioactive waste deep underground….

If the technology proves successful and the government moves forward with deep borehole disposal, there must be no fracking-related injection wells in the vicinity…which some research has linked to seismic activity.

Currently, high-level radioactive waste — both from government sources and utilities’ nuclear power plants — is without a final burial site. The waste at power plants is stored on site in pools of water or in heavily fortified casks, while the government’s waste remains at its research labs.

But the 16,000-foot-deep boreholes could be used for high-level radioactive waste from the department’s decades of nuclear work originally slated to go to Yucca, including nearly 2,000 canisters of cesium and strontium now being stored in water at the department’s Hanford Site in Washington state.

Excerpts from , Feds seek borehole test for potential hot nuke waste burial, Associated Press, Feb. 14, 2016